Escrow Out Loud

Elevator phobias (#7), offer strategies (#15), leading real estate economists (#44), real estate jargon explained (#51), and only-in-San-Francisco stories (in every episode). Our podcast, Escrow Out Loud, is a little like driving around in a car with us between properties on a home tour.

Except it’s on your schedule. Listen anywhere, anytime:

 

 

 

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Episode Guide

Array
(
    [title] => #65: What Makes A Neighborhood?
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/65
    [guid] => 5c3637b7f2144c586646e1e7
    [desc] => 

Today, on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about neighborhoods and what defines them.


[00:21] Matt and Britton share stories of growing up; Matt was a suburban kid who later moved to rural Michigan and Britton remembers living in Anchorage, Alaska in a brand-new subdivision as a five-year-old.


[02:58] People often yearn to find the balance between living with nature in the great wilderness and the convenience of urban city living. Is suburbia a good enough compromise to make? The west side of San Francisco has great examples of suburbia residence parks where the aim was to bring more nature into neighborhoods.


[05:31] What makes a neighborhood? In some cases, it is geography and sometimes it’s the era of construction. We argue SF condo buildings can also be a neighborhood within a neighborhood e.g. The Watermark.


How small can a neighborhood be and still be considered a neighborhood?


[11:55] The San Francisco Planning Department states eight things on their website that define a neighborhood: 1. Walk to shops 2. Safe streets 3. Get around easily. 4. Housing choices 5. Gathering places 6. City services 7. Special character 8. A part of the whole.


How many neighborhoods does San Francisco have? SFAR says 89, wikipedia says a lot more... Not everyone agrees on this point!


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#65: What Makes A Neighborhood?

Today, on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about neighborhoods and what defines them.


[00:21] Matt and Britton share stories of growing up; Matt was a suburban kid who later moved to rural Michigan and Britton remembers living in Anchorage, Alaska in a brand-new subdivision as a five-year-old.


[02:58] People often yearn to find the balance between living with nature in the great wilderness and the convenience of urban city living. Is suburbia a good enough compromise to make? The west side of San Francisco has great examples of suburbia residence parks where the aim was to bring more nature into neighborhoods.


[05:31] What makes a neighborhood? In some cases, it is geography and sometimes it’s the era of construction. We argue SF condo buildings can also be a neighborhood within a neighborhood e.g. The Watermark.


How small can a neighborhood be and still be considered a neighborhood?


[11:55] The San Francisco Planning Department states eight things on their website that define a neighborhood: 1. Walk to shops 2. Safe streets 3. Get around easily. 4. Housing choices 5. Gathering places 6. City services 7. Special character 8. A part of the whole.


How many neighborhoods does San Francisco have? SFAR says 89, wikipedia says a lot more... Not everyone agrees on this point!


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #64: Lockbox Legends
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/64
    [guid] => 5c28f3b7ca65d65e77b57183
    [desc] => 

Lockboxes can be a convenient way for realtors to set up appointments for house viewings. However, they are not very commonly used in San Francisco. Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about why this is and alternative ways buyers view properties in this town.


[00:21] There are a few urban legends that explain why very few houses listed for sale in San Francisco are on lockbox, but Matt has his own theory. Much more common are open home viewings on Sundays or scheduled appointments during the week.


[04:06] Unlike other parts of the country, in San Francisco, weekend open houses are paramount. How does this work for tenant occupied properties?


[06:45] We wrap up today with Britton sharing a story about seeing houses!

For more on private showings and lockboxes listen to our previous episodes: Sketchy Showings and Is Anyone Home?


Thank you for listening.

If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#64: Lockbox Legends

Lockboxes can be a convenient way for realtors to set up appointments for house viewings. However, they are not very commonly used in San Francisco. Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about why this is and alternative ways buyers view properties in this town.


[00:21] There are a few urban legends that explain why very few houses listed for sale in San Francisco are on lockbox, but Matt has his own theory. Much more common are open home viewings on Sundays or scheduled appointments during the week.


[04:06] Unlike other parts of the country, in San Francisco, weekend open houses are paramount. How does this work for tenant occupied properties?


[06:45] We wrap up today with Britton sharing a story about seeing houses!

For more on private showings and lockboxes listen to our previous episodes: Sketchy Showings and Is Anyone Home?


Thank you for listening.

If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #63: Show Me The Money. Twice.
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/63
    [guid] => 5c1fb200cf4830f95c6030da
    [desc] => 

Money, money, money. Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about how and when to bring money into a real estate transaction!


[00:21] We begin today by walking you through what happens after you’ve submitted an offer on a house and it has been accepted. Where is the initial deposit going, how do you make the transfer and why is the standard amount in San Francisco 3% of the purchase price? Britton also explains why a personal check is accepted for the first deposit but not the final deposit.


Always remember to be vigilant and take steps to prevent wire fraud! We talk more about that in Episode 40: (Online) Safety First.


[03:47] After making the initial deposit and going through escrow it’s time for signing the closing documents. What does this mean and what if you have to sell stocks or take other steps to turn your down payment into cash that you can transfer?


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#63: Show Me The Money. Twice.

Money, money, money. Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about how and when to bring money into a real estate transaction!


[00:21] We begin today by walking you through what happens after you’ve submitted an offer on a house and it has been accepted. Where is the initial deposit going, how do you make the transfer and why is the standard amount in San Francisco 3% of the purchase price? Britton also explains why a personal check is accepted for the first deposit but not the final deposit.


Always remember to be vigilant and take steps to prevent wire fraud! We talk more about that in Episode 40: (Online) Safety First.


[03:47] After making the initial deposit and going through escrow it’s time for signing the closing documents. What does this mean and what if you have to sell stocks or take other steps to turn your down payment into cash that you can transfer?


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #62: Prop. 13 & Property Taxes in San Francisco 
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/62
    [guid] => 5c17c64bdd8edbe57a32cb0b
    [desc] => 

Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we cover one of the dreaded certainties of life, taxes; how property taxes work and how they are calculated.


[00:21] Before the taxpayer rebellion in 1978, that led to a change in proposition 13, looking at how properties were assessed in California, the county would asses property value and tax accordingly. Since the change in proposition 13, however, property taxes are capped at 1% of the purchase price of the property. Are there any other additions to this we should be aware of and do we still need to be worried about any increases in property value the next year?

We break it down by looking at an example.


[06:29] So, this probably sounds like a pretty good thing in the current market, with increasing property values, but what happens in a downturn?

Britton points out that another important aspect to be aware of is that the tax assessor’s office is in touch with the department of building inspections. What does this mean exactly? Well, they will be aware of any permits for improvements/expansions on the home and can therefore choose to re-asses in certain cases.


[08:55] When and how are the property taxes paid? Bills come out in October and can be paid in two instalments; 1st due Nov 1, delinquent. Dec 10.and the 2nd due Feb 1, delinquent April 10. There are also numerous payment options including, check by mail, online payments, or at the assessor’s office. But what happens if a tax payment is due while you are in escrow and what purchase price is used in this scenario?


[13:43] To wrap up, we talk about new construction, what can happen when the assessor’s office significantly drags behind in keeping records up to date and what the penalty is on not paying your taxes on time!


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#62: Prop. 13 & Property Taxes in San Francisco

Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we cover one of the dreaded certainties of life, taxes; how property taxes work and how they are calculated.


[00:21] Before the taxpayer rebellion in 1978, that led to a change in proposition 13, looking at how properties were assessed in California, the county would asses property value and tax accordingly. Since the change in proposition 13, however, property taxes are capped at 1% of the purchase price of the property. Are there any other additions to this we should be aware of and do we still need to be worried about any increases in property value the next year?

We break it down by looking at an example.


[06:29] So, this probably sounds like a pretty good thing in the current market, with increasing property values, but what happens in a downturn?

Britton points out that another important aspect to be aware of is that the tax assessor’s office is in touch with the department of building inspections. What does this mean exactly? Well, they will be aware of any permits for improvements/expansions on the home and can therefore choose to re-asses in certain cases.


[08:55] When and how are the property taxes paid? Bills come out in October and can be paid in two instalments; 1st due Nov 1, delinquent. Dec 10.and the 2nd due Feb 1, delinquent April 10. There are also numerous payment options including, check by mail, online payments, or at the assessor’s office. But what happens if a tax payment is due while you are in escrow and what purchase price is used in this scenario?


[13:43] To wrap up, we talk about new construction, what can happen when the assessor’s office significantly drags behind in keeping records up to date and what the penalty is on not paying your taxes on time!


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #61: Prada Thieves, Armed Guards, Joe Montana & Soup
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/61-prada-thieves-armed-gaurds-joe-montana-soup
    [guid] => 5c0aac9cace3e7f53357c059
    [desc] => 

Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we regale you with some tales from the broker’s tours.


[00:21] You may be wondering, what all these open home signs on Tuesdays are all about? Tuesday broker’s tour is on! A broker’s tour is an opportunity for agents to tour new listings so that they can tell clients about them. It is also a great opportunity to catch up with other agents and keep a pulse on the market. So why was Matt terrified of them when first starting out?


[03:28] There’s some interesting stuff that goes on during a broker’s tour. There was a case of the disappearing Prada shoes, a run-in with some armed guards, as well as the occasional signing of a release of liability form. What’s more, sometimes there is soup!


[09:24] San Francisco is a busy city and all the cars and parking on broker’s tour can be a test of patience on the nearby residents. Matt considers attempting the tour on a bicycle and shares advice on how to deal with an irate homeowner whose parking you might have blocked.


[11:57] Another exciting thing that can happen on these tours is a celebrity drop-in; Britton talks Joe Montana sightings and whether the regular buyers are welcome at the broker’s tours?


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#61: Prada Thieves, Armed Guards, Joe Montana & Soup

Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we regale you with some tales from the broker’s tours.


[00:21] You may be wondering, what all these open home signs on Tuesdays are all about? Tuesday broker’s tour is on! A broker’s tour is an opportunity for agents to tour new listings so that they can tell clients about them. It is also a great opportunity to catch up with other agents and keep a pulse on the market. So why was Matt terrified of them when first starting out?


[03:28] There’s some interesting stuff that goes on during a broker’s tour. There was a case of the disappearing Prada shoes, a run-in with some armed guards, as well as the occasional signing of a release of liability form. What’s more, sometimes there is soup!


[09:24] San Francisco is a busy city and all the cars and parking on broker’s tour can be a test of patience on the nearby residents. Matt considers attempting the tour on a bicycle and shares advice on how to deal with an irate homeowner whose parking you might have blocked.


[11:57] Another exciting thing that can happen on these tours is a celebrity drop-in; Britton talks Joe Montana sightings and whether the regular buyers are welcome at the broker’s tours?


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #60: Agency Relationships Redone
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/agency-relationships-redone
    [guid] => 5c0a80cdace3e7f53357c045
    [desc] => 

A note from Matt about this episode: Agency relationships are really important, and the first time we discussed them (episode 14) we had no idea how to record a podcast. Episode 60 is another look at agency relationships in San Francisco real estate. - Matt

---

Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about one of the most important, and at the same time least understood, concepts in real estate – agency relationships.


[01:17] Let's start off by looking at real estate agency – what an agent does and what our fiduciary duties entail. Loyalty, confidentiality and the exercise of the utmost care are just a few of our duties to our clients, what are some others?


[02:15] Now that we know what an agent does, let’s talk about who they do it for. There are three types of agency relationships in California, but keep in mind that this does differ by state. Important disclaimer: we are not lawyers and don’t offer legal advice. Britton gives an overview of types of agencies in California: buyer agency, seller agency, and dual agency.


[03:49] People often think dual-agency means that both the buyer and the seller must be working with the same individual i.e., the same exact person with the same exact face! Britton and Matt myth-bust this assumption for us! They explain that the fiduciary relationship goes a level higher than that; the agency relationship is not with an individual agent, it is with the brokerage that holds the license for that agent.

A real-world example: if two different real estate agents from the same brokerage are involved, one representing the seller and the other the buyer, the relationship is dual-agency, and it is at the brokerage level. When a single individual is representing both sides of the transaction it is a specific type of dual-agency.


[06:22] While we are on the subject of agency relationships we explain the three steps in an agency relationship in California; disclosure, election and confirmation. How will the confirmation step change in the new revision of the purchase contract coming up in 2019? Also, what is an implied agency?


[11:34] Finally, how important is it to engage with an agent in the process of buying a house, or should you try and go about it yourself? We explain why it makes sense to put your team together first and what a dual agency can offer.


[15:23] Matt and Britton take us back to a time and share their own experiences in buying their first houses! Back then listings were sent through to them using something called a fax machine.


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next time!

[date] => )

#60: Agency Relationships Redone

A note from Matt about this episode: Agency relationships are really important, and the first time we discussed them (episode 14) we had no idea how to record a podcast. Episode 60 is another look at agency relationships in San Francisco real estate. - Matt

---

Today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk about one of the most important, and at the same time least understood, concepts in real estate – agency relationships.


[01:17] Let's start off by looking at real estate agency – what an agent does and what our fiduciary duties entail. Loyalty, confidentiality and the exercise of the utmost care are just a few of our duties to our clients, what are some others?


[02:15] Now that we know what an agent does, let’s talk about who they do it for. There are three types of agency relationships in California, but keep in mind that this does differ by state. Important disclaimer: we are not lawyers and don’t offer legal advice. Britton gives an overview of types of agencies in California: buyer agency, seller agency, and dual agency.


[03:49] People often think dual-agency means that both the buyer and the seller must be working with the same individual i.e., the same exact person with the same exact face! Britton and Matt myth-bust this assumption for us! They explain that the fiduciary relationship goes a level higher than that; the agency relationship is not with an individual agent, it is with the brokerage that holds the license for that agent.

A real-world example: if two different real estate agents from the same brokerage are involved, one representing the seller and the other the buyer, the relationship is dual-agency, and it is at the brokerage level. When a single individual is representing both sides of the transaction it is a specific type of dual-agency.


[06:22] While we are on the subject of agency relationships we explain the three steps in an agency relationship in California; disclosure, election and confirmation. How will the confirmation step change in the new revision of the purchase contract coming up in 2019? Also, what is an implied agency?


[11:34] Finally, how important is it to engage with an agent in the process of buying a house, or should you try and go about it yourself? We explain why it makes sense to put your team together first and what a dual agency can offer.


[15:23] Matt and Britton take us back to a time and share their own experiences in buying their first houses! Back then listings were sent through to them using something called a fax machine.


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next time!

Array
(
    [title] => #59: Refreshed Real Estate Jargon 
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/59-real-estate-terminology-gentrifies-itself-in-2019
    [guid] => 5be9a392e6b07996425a8b55
    [desc] => 

Matt recently returned from the California Association of Realtors 3rd (and final) Business Meeting of 2018 where he learned all about the changes in real estate terminology that will be encoded in the legislation. So, armed with this new information, today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we are playing our ever popular game, Question That Answer!


[02:43] We start off with a minor caveat and launch into the new AB 1289 terminology which comes into effect on January 1, 2019.


[03:29] Questions we cover: The person buying the property? The person selling the property? Goodbye to the transferee and the transferor! Information that relates to the client representation?


[05:12] Quick tangent: An example of a change to the dual agency part of what is considered confidential information that happens when this law is updated.

Among other things, with these changes coming into effect, we can no longer disclose the seller’s motivation for selling, which is one of the commonly asked questions and not relevant to the value of the property.


[09:48] Back to the questions: A personal representative acting to sell a property on behalf of a dead person? A person designated to manage assets in a trust? Which one these is generally exempt from completing the transfer disclosure statement? Bonus question: Why does this make sense?


[12:27] The agent that represents the buyer? This was previously confusing terminology, so, we are particularly excited about this one!


Final question: The number of days in which a buyer who receives a revised transfer disclosure statement has, to cancel the contract?


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#59: Refreshed Real Estate Jargon

Matt recently returned from the California Association of Realtors 3rd (and final) Business Meeting of 2018 where he learned all about the changes in real estate terminology that will be encoded in the legislation. So, armed with this new information, today on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we are playing our ever popular game, Question That Answer!


[02:43] We start off with a minor caveat and launch into the new AB 1289 terminology which comes into effect on January 1, 2019.


[03:29] Questions we cover: The person buying the property? The person selling the property? Goodbye to the transferee and the transferor! Information that relates to the client representation?


[05:12] Quick tangent: An example of a change to the dual agency part of what is considered confidential information that happens when this law is updated.

Among other things, with these changes coming into effect, we can no longer disclose the seller’s motivation for selling, which is one of the commonly asked questions and not relevant to the value of the property.


[09:48] Back to the questions: A personal representative acting to sell a property on behalf of a dead person? A person designated to manage assets in a trust? Which one these is generally exempt from completing the transfer disclosure statement? Bonus question: Why does this make sense?


[12:27] The agent that represents the buyer? This was previously confusing terminology, so, we are particularly excited about this one!


Final question: The number of days in which a buyer who receives a revised transfer disclosure statement has, to cancel the contract?


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #58: From Zero to One
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/58
    [guid] => 5bdc8426df8bc6fd1e0d47a4
    [desc] => 

Today, on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we look back on the last year in real estate as we celebrate our one year anniversary as Jackson Fuller Real Estate brokerage.


[00:21] It has been a year since Jackson Fuller Real Estate became an independent brokerage. In that time there have been a lot of shifts (Compass is making a significant impact!) in the San Francisco brokerage community, but we can honestly say that we have had a phenomenal year!


[04:47] Most people appreciate that real estate is a business very focused on relationships; or if it isn’t, it should be. Trust and connections with clients are more important than the name of the company on the business card.


[05:59] What do we wish we knew before we first started? We spent a good amount of time thinking and planning before we started the Jackson Fuller brokerage and even though loyalty made the change bitter sweet, it was the logical next step.


[08:47] Real estate agents are paranoid optimists; agents always have concerns about looming threats to their existence all the while believing that everything will turn out for the best. So, what did we think we could offer by starting our own brokerage? We have more flexibility to do things our way, setting our own rules in what we can offer to our client.


[11:47] Matt finishes this week’s episode with a quick rant about printers and we look at what comes next for our brokerage.


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#58: From Zero to One

Today, on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we look back on the last year in real estate as we celebrate our one year anniversary as Jackson Fuller Real Estate brokerage.


[00:21] It has been a year since Jackson Fuller Real Estate became an independent brokerage. In that time there have been a lot of shifts (Compass is making a significant impact!) in the San Francisco brokerage community, but we can honestly say that we have had a phenomenal year!


[04:47] Most people appreciate that real estate is a business very focused on relationships; or if it isn’t, it should be. Trust and connections with clients are more important than the name of the company on the business card.


[05:59] What do we wish we knew before we first started? We spent a good amount of time thinking and planning before we started the Jackson Fuller brokerage and even though loyalty made the change bitter sweet, it was the logical next step.


[08:47] Real estate agents are paranoid optimists; agents always have concerns about looming threats to their existence all the while believing that everything will turn out for the best. So, what did we think we could offer by starting our own brokerage? We have more flexibility to do things our way, setting our own rules in what we can offer to our client.


[11:47] Matt finishes this week’s episode with a quick rant about printers and we look at what comes next for our brokerage.


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favourite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #57: Make Surfboards, Marry Well, or Become an Attorney?
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/57-who-can-afford-a-home-in-san-francisco
    [guid] => 5bd3585de3e07d8d4471132e
    [desc] => 

A nurse. A lawyer. A teacher. An electrician. In this episode of Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast we talk about what kind of people we've worked with over the years to buy a home in San Francisco.


[00:21] San Francisco is an expensive city, it’s true. Even if you make a great salary, that doesn't guarantee you'll be able to buy a home. San Francisco isn't also just a town for the extremely wealthy. We have worked with people from all walks of life who figured out a way to get in to the San Francisco real estate market. From creative types such as writers and surf board makers, to medical professionals and lawyers, to tech people and entrepreneurs as well as teachers, accountants, electricians and a variety of other professions.


[06:15] Previous generations would often buy a house they would live in for the rest of their life. Today, in San Francisco especially, people buy a house that they can afford to live in and that suits their needs today. If they are able to afford more that they can "grow" into, that's great - but it may not necessarily make sense to wait. This is actually good advice for buying a property in San Francisco. Rather than waiting for an ideal house, something that works for your current situation may make it easier to make a switch later when opportunity and need arises.


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#57: Make Surfboards, Marry Well, or Become an Attorney?

A nurse. A lawyer. A teacher. An electrician. In this episode of Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast we talk about what kind of people we've worked with over the years to buy a home in San Francisco.


[00:21] San Francisco is an expensive city, it’s true. Even if you make a great salary, that doesn't guarantee you'll be able to buy a home. San Francisco isn't also just a town for the extremely wealthy. We have worked with people from all walks of life who figured out a way to get in to the San Francisco real estate market. From creative types such as writers and surf board makers, to medical professionals and lawyers, to tech people and entrepreneurs as well as teachers, accountants, electricians and a variety of other professions.


[06:15] Previous generations would often buy a house they would live in for the rest of their life. Today, in San Francisco especially, people buy a house that they can afford to live in and that suits their needs today. If they are able to afford more that they can "grow" into, that's great - but it may not necessarily make sense to wait. This is actually good advice for buying a property in San Francisco. Rather than waiting for an ideal house, something that works for your current situation may make it easier to make a switch later when opportunity and need arises.


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #56: Precisely-ish, Sordid Sources for San Francisco Real Estate
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/56-precisely-ish-sordid-sources-for-san-francisco-real-estat
    [guid] => 5bca5d8e0d46b9226faefe84
    [desc] => 

Welcome to another episode of Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast. This week we focus in on one deceptively tricky real estate statistic: How many homes are for sale, at any given time, in San Francisco?


[00:58] Now, you may ask yourself (like we did): “What could be difficult about figuring this out?” and - as we said - we thought that this sounds like a fairly straightforward number to determine. However, depending on which source you use, the number varies from about 950 properties at the very low end, to 1981 properties at the other end of the scale, with a lot of different numbers in between.


[04:02] Why are we seeing such a large variation in the number of homes for sale that are being reported? There are a number of factors that appear to be skewing the results we are seeing. What are the things to consider when looking at stats about how many homes are currently on the market? There are at least six different factors that account for the huge variation in results: 1. Sources; 2. Off-line property market; 3. Property status; 4. Property types; 5. Statistical smoothing; and 6. New construction.


[14:58] As it is probably abundantly clear by this point, finding the exact number can be a challenge. When you hear a SF real estate statistic, be sure you understand where it is coming from and what the limitations might be. Or, just listen to another Question that Answer episode. Or simply get in touch to see if we can help!


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode please leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

[date] => )

#56: Precisely-ish, Sordid Sources for San Francisco Real Estate

Welcome to another episode of Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast. This week we focus in on one deceptively tricky real estate statistic: How many homes are for sale, at any given time, in San Francisco?


[00:58] Now, you may ask yourself (like we did): “What could be difficult about figuring this out?” and - as we said - we thought that this sounds like a fairly straightforward number to determine. However, depending on which source you use, the number varies from about 950 properties at the very low end, to 1981 properties at the other end of the scale, with a lot of different numbers in between.


[04:02] Why are we seeing such a large variation in the number of homes for sale that are being reported? There are a number of factors that appear to be skewing the results we are seeing. What are the things to consider when looking at stats about how many homes are currently on the market? There are at least six different factors that account for the huge variation in results: 1. Sources; 2. Off-line property market; 3. Property status; 4. Property types; 5. Statistical smoothing; and 6. New construction.


[14:58] As it is probably abundantly clear by this point, finding the exact number can be a challenge. When you hear a SF real estate statistic, be sure you understand where it is coming from and what the limitations might be. Or, just listen to another Question that Answer episode. Or simply get in touch to see if we can help!


Thank you for listening. If you enjoyed this episode please leave us a review on your favorite platform, tell your friends and don’t forget to join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #55: Insuring My Right To Raise Dinosaurs?
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/55
    [guid] => 5bc0da6cd11b0b6f30ec1452
    [desc] => 

Welcome to another episode of Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast. Join us again this week for the second half of our discussion about title insurance when buying a home in San Francisco. We introduce title and escrow insurance in episode 53, Question That Answer.


[00:21] Picking up where we left off in Episode 53 with items that are found on a title report, Britton begins with another example of a defect in title insurance: a mechanic's lien. Britton introduces the idea of a mechanic's lien and gives a theoretical example of how this might come about. A preliminary title report is designed and supposed to show everything that is recorded in the legal public record against the property. Things that may be recorded in the public record are items like a mechanic's lien, existing owner's tax bill and/or mortgages, unpaid utility bills for utilities like garbage or water, CC&Rs for a condo, to give a few examples. These things are typically called exceptions - think of them like pre-existing conditions for health insurance.


[03:37] After the title company removes the "defects" and you are delivered "clean" title, title insurance policies are designed to protect you from things like an unknown mechanic's lien. One way that title insurance is different than most insurance policies is that you pay for it once and the policy lasts for as long as you own the home and/or mortgage.


[05:45] But... is everything about title insurance policies quite as magical as it seems? The flip side of title insurance companies is that they are, in fact, still insurance companies and act as you’d expect an insurance company to behave. Profit is made when revenue exceeds claims...


[08:32] Which leads to a question we get, do you really need title insurance? Lots of people have different feelings about this one, but unless you are a cash buyer your lender will answer the question for you: you will be getting title insurance.


[12:02] Finally, in residential real estate who traditionally pays for title insurance in San Francisco and how much does it cost?


Thank you for joining us. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for another episode!

[date] => )

#55: Insuring My Right To Raise Dinosaurs?

Welcome to another episode of Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast. Join us again this week for the second half of our discussion about title insurance when buying a home in San Francisco. We introduce title and escrow insurance in episode 53, Question That Answer.


[00:21] Picking up where we left off in Episode 53 with items that are found on a title report, Britton begins with another example of a defect in title insurance: a mechanic's lien. Britton introduces the idea of a mechanic's lien and gives a theoretical example of how this might come about. A preliminary title report is designed and supposed to show everything that is recorded in the legal public record against the property. Things that may be recorded in the public record are items like a mechanic's lien, existing owner's tax bill and/or mortgages, unpaid utility bills for utilities like garbage or water, CC&Rs for a condo, to give a few examples. These things are typically called exceptions - think of them like pre-existing conditions for health insurance.


[03:37] After the title company removes the "defects" and you are delivered "clean" title, title insurance policies are designed to protect you from things like an unknown mechanic's lien. One way that title insurance is different than most insurance policies is that you pay for it once and the policy lasts for as long as you own the home and/or mortgage.


[05:45] But... is everything about title insurance policies quite as magical as it seems? The flip side of title insurance companies is that they are, in fact, still insurance companies and act as you’d expect an insurance company to behave. Profit is made when revenue exceeds claims...


[08:32] Which leads to a question we get, do you really need title insurance? Lots of people have different feelings about this one, but unless you are a cash buyer your lender will answer the question for you: you will be getting title insurance.


[12:02] Finally, in residential real estate who traditionally pays for title insurance in San Francisco and how much does it cost?


Thank you for joining us. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for another episode!

Array
(
    [title] => #54: Statistics of Doom? September 2018 San Francisco Real Estate Market Update
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/54-statistics-of-doom-september-san-francisco-real-estate-ma
    [guid] => 5bb7a91a0a6dde4d39f2dfde
    [desc] => 

This week our San Francisco Real Estate podcast turns to the rearview mirror for a September 2018 market update.


[00:45] There's been chatter in the San Francisco property market about properties not receiving offers and price reductions returning to the marketplace. Does this mean that there is a market shift looming? Are these stories and anecdotes, or leading indicators of a looming market shift? We try and take some real estate market statistics from the San Francisco multiple listing service (MLS) to see if they might shed some light on the situation; is there really a market shift, or is all still noise?


[03:51] Real Estate valuation can be elusively complicated even though it seems simple. It can often include both the hard analysis of statistics as well as the more subjective personal factors that matter when people buy homes. Sample size is also an essential factor, and SF is a (relatively) small market. Most of the statistics that are reported in the media cover the entire bay area (7 or 9 county region, much more area than just SF) and aren't representative of SF in particular. It can be downright impossible to determine the health of the San Francisco real estate market using just those articles.


[07:18] If you want an accurate picture of what's happening in the market make sure you are looking at SF specifically. But, then the situation will also vary depending on a specific neighborhood as well as property type.


[09:00] The interest rates are rising, and we are seeing things are taking a little longer to happen; is this a blip or are things about to fall? We discuss the last time there was a downturn.


[11:06] It is no secret that in the previous few years it has been a rough market for buyers. Currently, the prices aren't falling, but things are taking longer. We share why buyers shouldn't get scared off by this and why it might actually be a good time for them.


[13:37] So, let's look at some stats. Regarding quantity (year-to-date) re-sales are up, pending sales are up overall, sold listings are up overall and active listings are up.


[16:06] Price year-to-date figures show that the sales price for the overall market is up 8% (single families up 17% and condos up 6%). Properties sold over the listing price are also up 4%; so far 81% of single family homes and 61% of condos sold over listing price this year! We also discuss list price received and price per square foot.


[19:30] Finally, we wrap up today by looking at metrics about time on market and months supply of inventory. Are we currently in a balanced market? We look forward to hearing your thoughts in the comments or via social!


Thank you for joining us. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for another episode!

[date] => )

#54: Statistics of Doom? September 2018 San Francisco Real Estate Market Update

This week our San Francisco Real Estate podcast turns to the rearview mirror for a September 2018 market update.


[00:45] There's been chatter in the San Francisco property market about properties not receiving offers and price reductions returning to the marketplace. Does this mean that there is a market shift looming? Are these stories and anecdotes, or leading indicators of a looming market shift? We try and take some real estate market statistics from the San Francisco multiple listing service (MLS) to see if they might shed some light on the situation; is there really a market shift, or is all still noise?


[03:51] Real Estate valuation can be elusively complicated even though it seems simple. It can often include both the hard analysis of statistics as well as the more subjective personal factors that matter when people buy homes. Sample size is also an essential factor, and SF is a (relatively) small market. Most of the statistics that are reported in the media cover the entire bay area (7 or 9 county region, much more area than just SF) and aren't representative of SF in particular. It can be downright impossible to determine the health of the San Francisco real estate market using just those articles.


[07:18] If you want an accurate picture of what's happening in the market make sure you are looking at SF specifically. But, then the situation will also vary depending on a specific neighborhood as well as property type.


[09:00] The interest rates are rising, and we are seeing things are taking a little longer to happen; is this a blip or are things about to fall? We discuss the last time there was a downturn.


[11:06] It is no secret that in the previous few years it has been a rough market for buyers. Currently, the prices aren't falling, but things are taking longer. We share why buyers shouldn't get scared off by this and why it might actually be a good time for them.


[13:37] So, let's look at some stats. Regarding quantity (year-to-date) re-sales are up, pending sales are up overall, sold listings are up overall and active listings are up.


[16:06] Price year-to-date figures show that the sales price for the overall market is up 8% (single families up 17% and condos up 6%). Properties sold over the listing price are also up 4%; so far 81% of single family homes and 61% of condos sold over listing price this year! We also discuss list price received and price per square foot.


[19:30] Finally, we wrap up today by looking at metrics about time on market and months supply of inventory. Are we currently in a balanced market? We look forward to hearing your thoughts in the comments or via social!


Thank you for joining us. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for another episode!

Array
(
    [title] => #53: Question That Answer, or: What We Think A Good Realtor Does
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/53
    [guid] => 5bae518ec87e962e7fd2710a
    [desc] => 

Our San Francisco Real Estate podcast turns to title insurance and escrow this week, and to try and make a relatively dry topic a bit more interesting, we decide to do what we do every day for our clients - question that answer! But first, Matt looks in the mirror after a bad podcast performance and a quick review of our stats reveals how very popular game shows are.


[00:54] With the Jargon Jeopardy episode being one of our most popular episodes, and us not wanting to get a letter from anyone's attorney for using a trademarked term, Matt was inspired to come up with a new name for our most popular game show that's a lot like that one with Alex. Question That Answer seemed like a great description because, as we chat about, it is how we help our clients.


[02:35] We also believe it is not only important to get answers, it is also important to understand them. This is where Britton's experience as a high-school teacher (or is it her past life as a private investigator?) comes very useful!


[04:07] Introducing our next topic of escrow and title insurance with the Inaugural round of Question That Answer. Some Questions we cover are: Title Insurance, Title Insurance Companies, Escrow. As a side note - how Escrow is handled in California may vary from your state, and this show is for entertainment purposes!


[08:32] So, how many title insurance policies do we need? Do you have to have it if you are paying cash? What if we’re paying cash and don’t want a title insurance policy? What about if we are not using cash and are getting a loan from a bank instead?


[10:23] Britton explains the difference between the lenders policy and the owner’s policy of title insurance. We’ve been talking about defects, liens, encumbrance and easements but what do these all mean and what are some examples? Britton shares the story of a San Francisco story (perhaps a true story) about a Glen Park home with a major easement for a utility company....


Thank you for joining us for part 1 of this episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and don’t forget to join us again next week for part 2!

[date] => )

#53: Question That Answer, or: What We Think A Good Realtor Does

Our San Francisco Real Estate podcast turns to title insurance and escrow this week, and to try and make a relatively dry topic a bit more interesting, we decide to do what we do every day for our clients - question that answer! But first, Matt looks in the mirror after a bad podcast performance and a quick review of our stats reveals how very popular game shows are.


[00:54] With the Jargon Jeopardy episode being one of our most popular episodes, and us not wanting to get a letter from anyone's attorney for using a trademarked term, Matt was inspired to come up with a new name for our most popular game show that's a lot like that one with Alex. Question That Answer seemed like a great description because, as we chat about, it is how we help our clients.


[02:35] We also believe it is not only important to get answers, it is also important to understand them. This is where Britton's experience as a high-school teacher (or is it her past life as a private investigator?) comes very useful!


[04:07] Introducing our next topic of escrow and title insurance with the Inaugural round of Question That Answer. Some Questions we cover are: Title Insurance, Title Insurance Companies, Escrow. As a side note - how Escrow is handled in California may vary from your state, and this show is for entertainment purposes!


[08:32] So, how many title insurance policies do we need? Do you have to have it if you are paying cash? What if we’re paying cash and don’t want a title insurance policy? What about if we are not using cash and are getting a loan from a bank instead?


[10:23] Britton explains the difference between the lenders policy and the owner’s policy of title insurance. We’ve been talking about defects, liens, encumbrance and easements but what do these all mean and what are some examples? Britton shares the story of a San Francisco story (perhaps a true story) about a Glen Park home with a major easement for a utility company....


Thank you for joining us for part 1 of this episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and don’t forget to join us again next week for part 2!

Array
(
    [title] => #52: House Hunters
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/52-house-hunters
    [guid] => 5ba506e3bd678a1f34ba1d2e
    [desc] => 

Our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, Escrow Out Loud, is at a major milestone: with 52 episodes we now have enough podcasts about San Francisco real estate for you to listen to one every week for an entire year!


Verbal offers, llama trainers, no paperwork...today we talk about an American reality TV show called House Hunters. American reality TV is pretty realistic in terms of portraying real-world experiences, right? We discuss...


[01:20] The premise of House Hunters US (there is also House Hunters International) is that there is a couple (or sometimes just a single) who are looking for a new place to live. Interestingly though, but not overly surprising given this is a realty show, the couple almost never want the same thing.


[03:15] The budgets on the show vary and a lot of the times the city they are in remains a mystery to the viewer. The budget is also typically presented as a source of contention between the couple. In our experience this does not happen very often. More often than not couples tend to agree on the amount they wish to spend.


[06:38] Is the exterior of a home important to you when deciding on a property? On the show this seems to be a very important element in making the final decision on a property. Which reminds of us an earlier podcast, Avocado Green Appliances and Faux Brick where we talked with Kevin from Sawyers Design and his take on viewing a property from the exterior.


[09:18] The couple is always shown three different properties and then they pick one. Only three properties? Hmm this seems unlikely to us. Britton may know the realty behind this reality TV set-up.


[12:47] To wrap up, we don’t recommend that you form your expectations of buying property based on what you see on the show. The process is fairly unrealistic, especially when compared to our experiences with the market in San Francisco.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

[date] => )

#52: House Hunters

Our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, Escrow Out Loud, is at a major milestone: with 52 episodes we now have enough podcasts about San Francisco real estate for you to listen to one every week for an entire year!


Verbal offers, llama trainers, no paperwork...today we talk about an American reality TV show called House Hunters. American reality TV is pretty realistic in terms of portraying real-world experiences, right? We discuss...


[01:20] The premise of House Hunters US (there is also House Hunters International) is that there is a couple (or sometimes just a single) who are looking for a new place to live. Interestingly though, but not overly surprising given this is a realty show, the couple almost never want the same thing.


[03:15] The budgets on the show vary and a lot of the times the city they are in remains a mystery to the viewer. The budget is also typically presented as a source of contention between the couple. In our experience this does not happen very often. More often than not couples tend to agree on the amount they wish to spend.


[06:38] Is the exterior of a home important to you when deciding on a property? On the show this seems to be a very important element in making the final decision on a property. Which reminds of us an earlier podcast, Avocado Green Appliances and Faux Brick where we talked with Kevin from Sawyers Design and his take on viewing a property from the exterior.


[09:18] The couple is always shown three different properties and then they pick one. Only three properties? Hmm this seems unlikely to us. Britton may know the realty behind this reality TV set-up.


[12:47] To wrap up, we don’t recommend that you form your expectations of buying property based on what you see on the show. The process is fairly unrealistic, especially when compared to our experiences with the market in San Francisco.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #51: Jargon Jeopardy
    [link] => https://jacksonfuller.com/
    [guid] => 5b9b9d174f9c8ef16856ce29
    [desc] => 

This week on our San Francisco real estate podcast Escrow Out Loud, we decide to play a game (since we recorded this edition on a holiday weekend).


[00:29] Britton is really, really good at Scrabble, but that is not what we are playing today. Today we are playing Jargon Jeopardy!


[02:31] “What is Jargon Jeopardy?”, you may ask. Well, follow along as we play and explain commonly used real estate acronyms.


A few highlights:

SFAR/MSI/PMI/CCR/HOA (Angry Dogs in Elevators and Overweight Chihuahuas)/CID/PUD/HO6/CRS/GRI/CFC/RRR/LOI/LTV/BMR...


Phew! We have a lot of jargon in real estate. And this was just a small sample!


[12:45] Finally, Matt and Britton debate the true meaning of LOL.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

[date] => )

#51: Jargon Jeopardy

This week on our San Francisco real estate podcast Escrow Out Loud, we decide to play a game (since we recorded this edition on a holiday weekend).


[00:29] Britton is really, really good at Scrabble, but that is not what we are playing today. Today we are playing Jargon Jeopardy!


[02:31] “What is Jargon Jeopardy?”, you may ask. Well, follow along as we play and explain commonly used real estate acronyms.


A few highlights:

SFAR/MSI/PMI/CCR/HOA (Angry Dogs in Elevators and Overweight Chihuahuas)/CID/PUD/HO6/CRS/GRI/CFC/RRR/LOI/LTV/BMR...


Phew! We have a lot of jargon in real estate. And this was just a small sample!


[12:45] Finally, Matt and Britton debate the true meaning of LOL.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #50: Price per Square Foot Police
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/50
    [guid] => 5b8972cccc49b10c7bc898cc
    [desc] => 

After catching up on the market situation last week, we got to thinking about real estate statistics and how Realtors use and mis-use them. This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we were inspired to chat about one of the most popular real estate statistics in San Francisco: price per square foot.


[00:21] Price per square foot (PPSF or $/SF) is a useful metric for pricing consideration and analysis. But where does the number come from? In San Francisco, MLS listings often contain a square footage measurement that allows us to calculate price per square foot. However, MLS sources for square footage come from a variety of sources, and there are no "square footage police" who verify, regulate, or monitor the reporting of square footage.


Finally, we talk about some property types where price per square foot may be a more useful or accurate measurement than in other areas. In a nutshell, price per square foot is most useful where there is homogenous housing.


[05:38] Another challenge in measuring square footage in existing as-built neighborhoods is the ‘bonus space’ a.k.a “This room was probably built without a permit space”. Given that bonus rooms are typically built without benefit of permits, appraisers don’t value these spaces at the same value (price per square foot) as warranted space within a home.


[07:41] When it comes to information on square footage, it is not only the different sources but also the different methods used to measure the footage that result in inconsistencies. Interior only? Walls? Stairs? Bonus space?


[10:36] Finally, a sales price consists of both market value and personal value. In any given sale, how do we know if the sales price is reflective of actual value or if the price was influenced by a personal factor?


Price per square foot is a great place to start a conversation or exploration of value, but because of the way numbers are measured and reported in San Francisco, it isn’t necessarily a 100% accurate data point.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

[date] => )

#50: Price per Square Foot Police

After catching up on the market situation last week, we got to thinking about real estate statistics and how Realtors use and mis-use them. This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we were inspired to chat about one of the most popular real estate statistics in San Francisco: price per square foot.


[00:21] Price per square foot (PPSF or $/SF) is a useful metric for pricing consideration and analysis. But where does the number come from? In San Francisco, MLS listings often contain a square footage measurement that allows us to calculate price per square foot. However, MLS sources for square footage come from a variety of sources, and there are no "square footage police" who verify, regulate, or monitor the reporting of square footage.


Finally, we talk about some property types where price per square foot may be a more useful or accurate measurement than in other areas. In a nutshell, price per square foot is most useful where there is homogenous housing.


[05:38] Another challenge in measuring square footage in existing as-built neighborhoods is the ‘bonus space’ a.k.a “This room was probably built without a permit space”. Given that bonus rooms are typically built without benefit of permits, appraisers don’t value these spaces at the same value (price per square foot) as warranted space within a home.


[07:41] When it comes to information on square footage, it is not only the different sources but also the different methods used to measure the footage that result in inconsistencies. Interior only? Walls? Stairs? Bonus space?


[10:36] Finally, a sales price consists of both market value and personal value. In any given sale, how do we know if the sales price is reflective of actual value or if the price was influenced by a personal factor?


Price per square foot is a great place to start a conversation or exploration of value, but because of the way numbers are measured and reported in San Francisco, it isn’t necessarily a 100% accurate data point.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #49: "Woo Woo" The July 2018 Market Update
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/49
    [guid] => 5b80256018f8ef3721870a8d
    [desc] => 

This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we chat about what has been happening in San Francisco real estate during the month of July.


[00:21] We start by talking about the typical summer dip in real estate inventory for San Francisco as sellers wait out the summer fog and buyers seek warmer weather and cooler markets. Real Estate blogs typically share bleak outlooks, and is that what is really going on out there and what has been our personal experience during this time?


[04:34] What do the market stats for July mean then? Trend or blip? While the San Francisco real estate market can turn on a dime, it doesn’t feel like that is what’s happening. Interest rates have not gone up enough to drive off buyers, so the slow down really seems like our typical summer slowdown. Also, meet the woo woo.


[05:38] What does appear unchanged in SF is that property prices are as unaffordable as ever. The median price for a single-family house in SF is approaching 1.7 million; there are still condos and houses in certain areas that go for far less than 1.6 million but all homes are now expensive. We repeat what have been saying for a while now, we need more housing!


[07:41] Is this the new normal? Could San Francisco infrastructure support a large influx of people? Some folks feel there is a valid argument that says, even if we build more housing, the city can’t absorb any more people without improvements to transit and other systems.


[11:13] And... back to July market stats! To wrap up, the month supply of inventory is still very tight, under two months, for both condos and single families. Luckily, in September and October we experience the second of our yearly bumps in inventory that may ease some of that pressure.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

[date] => )

#49: "Woo Woo" The July 2018 Market Update

This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we chat about what has been happening in San Francisco real estate during the month of July.


[00:21] We start by talking about the typical summer dip in real estate inventory for San Francisco as sellers wait out the summer fog and buyers seek warmer weather and cooler markets. Real Estate blogs typically share bleak outlooks, and is that what is really going on out there and what has been our personal experience during this time?


[04:34] What do the market stats for July mean then? Trend or blip? While the San Francisco real estate market can turn on a dime, it doesn’t feel like that is what’s happening. Interest rates have not gone up enough to drive off buyers, so the slow down really seems like our typical summer slowdown. Also, meet the woo woo.


[05:38] What does appear unchanged in SF is that property prices are as unaffordable as ever. The median price for a single-family house in SF is approaching 1.7 million; there are still condos and houses in certain areas that go for far less than 1.6 million but all homes are now expensive. We repeat what have been saying for a while now, we need more housing!


[07:41] Is this the new normal? Could San Francisco infrastructure support a large influx of people? Some folks feel there is a valid argument that says, even if we build more housing, the city can’t absorb any more people without improvements to transit and other systems.


[11:13] And... back to July market stats! To wrap up, the month supply of inventory is still very tight, under two months, for both condos and single families. Luckily, in September and October we experience the second of our yearly bumps in inventory that may ease some of that pressure.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #48: Water, Water, Water
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/48
    [guid] => 5b6da64b1fdceca10d0bc259
    [desc] => 

This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we wrap-up our conversation with David Milne, from Arch Home Inspection. If you missed the beginning of our interview, check out our previous two episodes!


[00:21] Buyers will commonly do their homework before the home inspection. This allows them to come prepared with questions. A home inspection however, will offer a different perspective and guidance, so buyers don’t have to worry about missing important details.


[01:24] We talk water! The most worrisome issues are usually somehow water related. David explains that we have to address water issues such as with dealing with rain, considering drainage and subterranean water.


[05:03] Each inspector has their own particular style. David explains how he tries to put things in perspective and get everyone engaged. How does he ensure that he is being fair to all parties involved while being realistic about the condition of the property?


[09:13] Building contractors look at materials differently to most people. Paint is a great example of this; most of us look at paint from an aesthetic point of view, but for David paint is a vehicle for keeping water out.


[11:24] Most of us will have our Spidey senses kick in as we clock-on to a certain vibe when stepping inside a property. David shares some tell-tale signs that there is something more going on that alert him to look closer. Open windows, candles and dehumidifiers are some great examples.


[14:31] Why are there no plastic pipes in San Francisco? In David’s experience logic does not always apply.


[17:54] To wrap up, David shares one way of looking at buying homes in San Francisco. With an old city such as this, when you are buying a house you are buying a piece of history.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

[date] => )

#48: Water, Water, Water

This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we wrap-up our conversation with David Milne, from Arch Home Inspection. If you missed the beginning of our interview, check out our previous two episodes!


[00:21] Buyers will commonly do their homework before the home inspection. This allows them to come prepared with questions. A home inspection however, will offer a different perspective and guidance, so buyers don’t have to worry about missing important details.


[01:24] We talk water! The most worrisome issues are usually somehow water related. David explains that we have to address water issues such as with dealing with rain, considering drainage and subterranean water.


[05:03] Each inspector has their own particular style. David explains how he tries to put things in perspective and get everyone engaged. How does he ensure that he is being fair to all parties involved while being realistic about the condition of the property?


[09:13] Building contractors look at materials differently to most people. Paint is a great example of this; most of us look at paint from an aesthetic point of view, but for David paint is a vehicle for keeping water out.


[11:24] Most of us will have our Spidey senses kick in as we clock-on to a certain vibe when stepping inside a property. David shares some tell-tale signs that there is something more going on that alert him to look closer. Open windows, candles and dehumidifiers are some great examples.


[14:31] Why are there no plastic pipes in San Francisco? In David’s experience logic does not always apply.


[17:54] To wrap up, David shares one way of looking at buying homes in San Francisco. With an old city such as this, when you are buying a house you are buying a piece of history.


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week!

Array
(
    [title] => #47: What Am I Looking At, What Am I Seeing?
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/47
    [guid] => 5b6873c47da62eab28c2367c
    [desc] => 

This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we continue our conversation with David Milne, from Arch Home Inspection. If you missed part one of our interview, check out our previous episode #46.


[00:21] A common buyer question is: Should I do an inspection on brand new construction or on the re-sale of a new construction home? What often stands out on this type of property is things go wrong during a remodel. We also talk about what a tank inspection is, other changes that have occurred over the decades, and various other inspections he's often asked about.


[04:50] What are some unusual things one can came across as a building inspector?


[06:01] David likes for people to understand what to expect in terms of the local environment and how that affects building construction. While old construction often had the same construction standards across the country, for new construction this can vary. Amazing fact: Before about 1900 it was not uncommon for homes to be originally built without a foundation!


[09:16] Because the difference between how new and old may be built, David explains how he makes sure he's seeing what he's looking at. Which requires switching his thinking caps through out the day depending on what he is looking at. What is quite helpful for him are his years of experience in the city of San Francisco and knowledge of its history.


[10:55] In terms of favorite neighborhoods, the avenues can make for a straightforward day on the job... Finally, David shares an unfortunate example where an artistic hobby can potentially turn into a hazardous situation...


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for the final part of our interview with David.

[date] => )

#47: What Am I Looking At, What Am I Seeing?

This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we continue our conversation with David Milne, from Arch Home Inspection. If you missed part one of our interview, check out our previous episode #46.


[00:21] A common buyer question is: Should I do an inspection on brand new construction or on the re-sale of a new construction home? What often stands out on this type of property is things go wrong during a remodel. We also talk about what a tank inspection is, other changes that have occurred over the decades, and various other inspections he's often asked about.


[04:50] What are some unusual things one can came across as a building inspector?


[06:01] David likes for people to understand what to expect in terms of the local environment and how that affects building construction. While old construction often had the same construction standards across the country, for new construction this can vary. Amazing fact: Before about 1900 it was not uncommon for homes to be originally built without a foundation!


[09:16] Because the difference between how new and old may be built, David explains how he makes sure he's seeing what he's looking at. Which requires switching his thinking caps through out the day depending on what he is looking at. What is quite helpful for him are his years of experience in the city of San Francisco and knowledge of its history.


[10:55] In terms of favorite neighborhoods, the avenues can make for a straightforward day on the job... Finally, David shares an unfortunate example where an artistic hobby can potentially turn into a hazardous situation...


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for the final part of our interview with David.

Array
(
    [title] => #46: Thousands of Home Inspections
    [link] => https://shows.pippa.io/jackson-fuller/homeinspections
    [guid] => 5b6075494c43ac1347a3f141
    [desc] => 

After a brief hiatus we're back with a brand new episode.


For most buyers, without previous experience in construction, knowing what to look out for when buying a property can be quite daunting. This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk to David Milne from Arch Home Inspections about the importance of home inspection.


[01:32] Why is it important for everyone to have a home inspection when buying a property? What it really comes down to is gathering information on the condition of the property, so that you can make the best decision going in. David explains there are normally two reports; one is a termite/pest inspection and the other is a contractor report which David would provide. A typical contractor's home inspection report includes everything from the foundations, exterior covering, roof condition, drainage conditions, water, the three utilities, water heater and heat system as well as looking for any alarm bells inside the building. Because a home inspection isn't really designed to cover appliances, David recommends people also consider a home warranty.


[05:17] The pest control inspectors are governed by a board that oversees them but in California there is no licensing for home inspection. What they do have is organizations such as ASHI and CREIA that provide governing standards to follow. What does home code compliance actually mean and how does it change over time?


[09:58] Since home inspectors are not regulated we should consider what the inspector's background is when choosing a good one. In David’s case experience in construction and working as a high-end trim installer made him an ideal fit for a career in home inspection.


[12:15] The process of home inspection can be an emotional and stressful process for everyone involved. For David his favorite inspectins are when dealing with first time buyers. He shares his favorite stories and explains how his approach is to reassure and relax them.


[14:14] Whether he is working with sellers, agents or buyers, David always aims to tell it as it is, without embellishing or leaning towards either side. A part of his job is to deal with objections and the best way he found to deal with this aspect of his job is to keep an open dialogue with people. He recommends that people talk to different contractors if they are not satisfied with the advice they are getting. A good rule of thumb to follow is that if you are hearing similar advice from different people, you are on the right track.


[19:55] Property prices keep climbing in San Francisco and have come a long way in recent years. This means that, proportionally, the major systems and structures cost less to fix now days. Changing the foundation now costs just 5% of the purchase price and is not as relatively daunting.


[22:02] Before beginning his inspection, David likes to ask people what their plans for the property are and advise them accordingly. Most of San Francisco is old and built with old redwood which is great quality. How is the newer construction different? Finally, what to do with old foundations and why it is a good idea to bundle your projects to get the best bang for your buck!


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for part two of our interview with David!

[date] => )

#46: Thousands of Home Inspections

After a brief hiatus we're back with a brand new episode.


For most buyers, without previous experience in construction, knowing what to look out for when buying a property can be quite daunting. This week on Escrow Out Loud, our San Francisco Real Estate podcast, we talk to David Milne from Arch Home Inspections about the importance of home inspection.


[01:32] Why is it important for everyone to have a home inspection when buying a property? What it really comes down to is gathering information on the condition of the property, so that you can make the best decision going in. David explains there are normally two reports; one is a termite/pest inspection and the other is a contractor report which David would provide. A typical contractor's home inspection report includes everything from the foundations, exterior covering, roof condition, drainage conditions, water, the three utilities, water heater and heat system as well as looking for any alarm bells inside the building. Because a home inspection isn't really designed to cover appliances, David recommends people also consider a home warranty.


[05:17] The pest control inspectors are governed by a board that oversees them but in California there is no licensing for home inspection. What they do have is organizations such as ASHI and CREIA that provide governing standards to follow. What does home code compliance actually mean and how does it change over time?


[09:58] Since home inspectors are not regulated we should consider what the inspector's background is when choosing a good one. In David’s case experience in construction and working as a high-end trim installer made him an ideal fit for a career in home inspection.


[12:15] The process of home inspection can be an emotional and stressful process for everyone involved. For David his favorite inspectins are when dealing with first time buyers. He shares his favorite stories and explains how his approach is to reassure and relax them.


[14:14] Whether he is working with sellers, agents or buyers, David always aims to tell it as it is, without embellishing or leaning towards either side. A part of his job is to deal with objections and the best way he found to deal with this aspect of his job is to keep an open dialogue with people. He recommends that people talk to different contractors if they are not satisfied with the advice they are getting. A good rule of thumb to follow is that if you are hearing similar advice from different people, you are on the right track.


[19:55] Property prices keep climbing in San Francisco and have come a long way in recent years. This means that, proportionally, the major systems and structures cost less to fix now days. Changing the foundation now costs just 5% of the purchase price and is not as relatively daunting.


[22:02] Before beginning his inspection, David likes to ask people what their plans for the property are and advise them accordingly. Most of San Francisco is old and built with old redwood which is great quality. How is the newer construction different? Finally, what to do with old foundations and why it is a good idea to bundle your projects to get the best bang for your buck!


Thank you for joining us for this week’s episode. We hope you enjoyed tuning in and join us again next week for part two of our interview with David!

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